Location
Location
Black Rhino Game Reserve is strategically located 33 kilometres north of the entrance to Sun City in a Malaria free area adjacent to the prestigious Pilansberg Game Reserve which in turn forms part of one of the most sort after Eco-Tourism destinations in Southern Africa. It is an area frequented by locals and tourists from all over the world - and therefore has the potential to attract a large number of overseas visitors.

The Reserve offers a Big Five Game Lodge investment opportunity, approximately 1 hour 30 minutes away from Johannesburg, and 33 kilometres away from all of the facilities of Sun City. It offers nature lovers an alluring combination of rolling hills, graceful valleys, grass land plains covered with pristine Bushveld and Tamboti forests away from the hustle and bustle of the busy city life.

Directions
Travel to Sun City along the N4. Turn right on the R510 to Sun City. From the Sun City gate travel in the direction of Rustenburg, on the R565 for approximately 4 kilometres . At the stop street, turn right and travel for approximately 32 kilometres north on the Madikwe road, where you will find the entrance of Black Rhino Game Reserve. It is a tar road all the way to the entrance.


Heritage Park
North West Parks Board have embarked on an 8 year plan to connect the 5800 hectare Pilanesberg National Park with the 80 000 hectare Madikwe Game Reserve.
This will create over 100 km of wildlife corridors where it is envisaged that the Black Rhino owners will enter into further traversing agreements with these new game farms.
Black Rhino is currently the 1st property to form part of this exciting corridor.

Heritage Park

PILANESBERG NATIONAL PARK - IN AN ANCIENT VOLCANIC CRATER
The crater of a long extinct volcano is the setting of Pilanesberg National Park - a fascinating alkaline complex produced by volcanic eruptions some 1300 million years ago. Pilanesberg is one of the largest volcanic complexes of its kind in the world. Its rare rock types and structure make it a unique geological feature.

The area is fringed by three concentric ridges or rings of hills - the formation rises from the surrounding plains like a bubble. The structure of the park is termed the "Pilanesberg National Park Alkaline Ring Complex".

Ancient, even by geological time scales, this extinct volcano is the most perfect example of an alkaline ring complex. A number of rare (but not necessarily economically important) minerals occur in the park. Pilanesberg National Park rates high amongst the world's outstanding geological phenomena.

Pilanesberg has survived ages of erosion and stands high above the surrounding bushveld plains. The early presence of man can be seen in the numerous Stone and Iron Age sites that are scattered throughout the park.

The park exists within the transition zone between the dry Kalahari and wetter Lowveld vegetation, commonly referred to as "Bushveld". Unlike any other large park, unique overlaps of mammals, birds and vegetation occur because of this transition zone.

Springbok, brown hyena, the red eyed bulbul, and camel thorn trees usually found in arid areas are found cohabitation with moist-area-limited impala, black eyed bulbul and Cape chestnut trees.

The colourful hues, varied habitats and panoramas will delight and entertain photographers and visitors.

The very topography makes the area a feast for the eye. Here are syenite koppies, thickly forested ravines, typical bushveld and also rolling grasslands and lightly wooded areas.

Off the centre of the park is Thabayadiotso, "the Proud Mountain". The Park ranks among the largest of the national parks in South Africa (it is in fact the fourth largest park) and covers an area of 55 000 hectare.

The beauty of Pilanesberg is reflected in a large central lake, the Mankwe Dam.

Over time, wind and water have carved a spectacular landscape with rocky outcrops, open grasslands, wooded valleys and thickets.

The creation of the Pilanesberg National Park is considered one of the most ambitious programmes of its kind to be undertaken anywhere in the world. The Operation Genesis, which involved the game-fencing of the reserve and the reintroduction of long-vanished species, began during the late 70's.

Today, Pilanesberg National Park accommodates virtually every mammal of southern Africa. Also home to the Big Five.

GENERAL
Visitors are offered many opportunities to experience the wonders of Pilanesberg. There are nearly 200 kilometres of excellent quality roads for either self-drives or guided drives, and professional guides operate within the park.

Numerous hides and scenic picnic sites enable the tourist to experience "out-of-car" experiences as well.

PILANESBERG DIVERSITY
Apart from its unique size, shape and rock types, the volcanic origin and resultant weathering of the extinct crater has resulted in a wide variety of landscapes and associated vegetation communities. This provides some of the most spectacular scenery in Southern Africa. It also provides a wide range of habitats for game animals. Because of this, Pilanesberg National Park has the potential to carry a wider variety of game species than any other similar sized game reserve in Southern Africa. Its potential for supporting rare and endangered species such as black rhino, roan, sable, tsessebe, foot-and-mouth free buffalo and wild dogs is particularly high. Thus apart from its conservation value, the area has very high game viewing and resource products potential.

PILANESBERG GEOLOGY
Geologically, the area is world famous. Its structure, termed the "Pilanesberg National Park Alkaline Ring Complex" was formed by volcanic eruptions some 1 200 million years ago. Ancient, even by geological time scales this extinct volcano is the most perfect example of an alkaline ring complex. There are only two other alkaline volcanoes in the world, in Russia and in Greenland. Neither are as clearly defined as Pilanesberg National Park. A number of rare (but not necessarily economically important) minerals occur in Pilanesberg National Park. Pilanesberg National Park clearly rates high amongst the world's outstanding geological phenomena.

PILANESBERG HISTORY
The history of Pilanesberg Game Reserve is unique amongst national parks in Africa. Pilanesberg National Park's special features of rugged landscape, well-watered valleys and attractive dwelling sites have made it a preferred site for human settlement for thousands of years.

Prior to its proclamation as a reserve in 1979, the Pilanesberg National Park Complex was degraded and depleted of indigenous game populations due to fairly intense settlement by commercial farmers. At considerable expense, the land has been restocked with game, the scars of human settlement were removed and tourism infrastructure was developed during the first 15 years (1979 and 1993). This constituted the largest and most expensive game stocking and land rehabilitation project ever undertaken in any African game reserve at the time.

A 110 kilometre peripheral Big Game fence was erected over some very rugged terrain, 188 kilometre of visitor roads have been developed and more than 6 000 head of game were introduced during the Operation Genesis game translocation programme. Thus, while wildlife resources are rapidly declining in most developing countries in Africa, Pilanesberg National Park is one of the few areas where this trend has been dramatically reversed. For this far-sighted action the North West Province (Previously Bop Parks) and its people have received worldwide acclaim and recognition. The challenge that lies ahead is to further develop and manage Pilanesberg National Park in such a way that the conservation, cultural, recreational and economic benefits of this far-sighted action can be optimally utilised to the benefit of current and future generations

PILANESBERG TERRAIN
Pilanesberg exists within the transition zone between the dry Kalahari and wetter Lowveld vegetation, commonly referred to as "Bushveld". Unlike any other large park, unique overlaps of mammals, birds and vegetation occur because of this transition zone. Springbok, brown hyaena, the redeyed bulbul, and camel thorn trees usually found in arid areas are found co-habitating with moist-area-limited impala, blackeyed bulbul and Cape chestnut trees. The colourful hues, varied habitats and panoramas will delight and entertain photographers and all but the most unobservant visitor. Pre-sunrise and post-sunset drives are possible owing to gate opening/closure times.

PILANESBERG WILDLIFE
Since late 1979, thanks to Operation Genesis - the largest game translocation ever undertaken at the time, tourists have been able to take note of nature's alphabet - from aardvark to zebra. The park boasts healthy populations of lion, leopard, black and white rhino, elephant and buffalo - Africa's "Big Five". A wide variety of rare and common species exist with endemic species like the nocturnal brown hyaena, the fleet-footed cheetah, the majestic sable, as well as giraffe, zebra, hippo and crocodile, to mention but a few.

PILANESBERG BIRD-LIFE
Bird watching is excellent with over 300 species recorded. Some are migrants, others permanent inhabitants; some eat carrion or live prey, others eat seeds, fruit or tiny water organisms.

There is a self-guided trail in the Walking Area at Manyane Complex in the east, which offers environmental education whilst enjoying game viewing and bird watching on foot. Also at Manyane is a walk-in aviary with over 80 species of indigenous birds.
 
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E-Mail: wildthing@winchestermarketing.com
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